Disability Statistics

UK Disability Statistics

Key Statistics

• 5.5 million Disabled men in the UK. (Government statistics; Family Resources Survey 2012/13 published in July 2014)

• 6.6 million Disabled women in the UK. (Government statistics; Family Resources Survey 2012/13 published in July 2014)

• From a population of 64.1 million, over 11 million people have a limiting long term illness, impairment or disability. (Office for Disability Issues*3 published January 2014)

• 4 out of 5 disabled people acquire their disability during their lives. (NHS Choices Livewell, last reviewed 30 April 2014)

• There are 6.5 million carers in the UK. (NHS Choices Livewell, last reviewed 30 April 2014)

• Of the working-age people with disabilities in the UK, almost half are employed. (NHS Choices Livewell, last reviewed 30 April 2014)

• 7 % (0.9 million) of children were disabled compared to 16% (6.1 million) of adults of working age and 43 % (5.1 million) of adults over State Pension age. (Family Resources Survey 2012/13, published July 2014

• More than 80% of people with a disability were born without it and find they have to adjust. (NHS Choices Livewell, last reviewed 30 April 2014)

• Almost two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. That’s approximately one person in 30. (RNIB Key Information and Statistics January 2015)

• By 2020, it is predicted, the number of people with sight loss will rise to over 2.25 million. (RNIB Key Information and Statistics January 2015)

• 100 people a day start to lose their sight in the UK. (RNIB, Data on Vision Matters, updated September 2013)

• One in six people in the UK struggle with literacy. This means their literacy is below the level expected of an eleven year old. (National Literacy Trust, State of the Nation, A picture of literacy in the UK today, January 2012)

Employment

• 44.3% of working age disabled people are economically inactive. This figure is nearly 4 times higher than non-disabled people (11.5%). (Papworth Trust Report 2013)

• Disabled people in work are paid about 10% less than non-disabled people. (Scope, 2014, Disability Facts and Figures)

• Disabled people are 4 times more likely to be out of work than non-disabled people. (Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2014)

• Almost half (48%) of unemployed disabled people said that flexible working would have helped them stay at work, but that they were not given this option. (Scope, 2013, Living Standards Survey)

• Three quarters (76%) of disabled people were unaware of, or had not received support from the Government’s Access to Work scheme 8 which helps pay for practical support for people with a disability, health or mental health condition to stay in work, or find work. (Scope Report April 2014)

• There are 6.9 million disabled people of working age in Great Britain. (GOV.UK, Press release New ad campaign launched at UK’s first Disability Employment Conference, 18 July 2013)

• 1 in 6 of those who become disabled while in work lose their employment during the first year after becoming disabled. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Disability in the United Kingdom 2012 IPPR report: Work for Disabled People)

Education

• Adults aged 16–64 with impairments are twice as likely as their peers to experience barriers to education and training opportunities, 33% and 16% respectively. (Office for National Statistics, 2014, Life Opportunities Survey)

• Disabled adults are nearly 3 times as likely to have no formal qualifications as non-disabled adults, 30% and 11% respectively. (Office for Disability Issues, 2012, Measuring National Well-being Education and Skills)

• The number of pupils with SEN decreased from 1.55 million pupils (18.7%) in 2013 to 1.49 million pupils (17.9%) in 2014. This is part of a continuing decline since 2010 when 21.1% of pupils had SEN. (Department for Education, 2014, Special Educational Needs in England, January 2014)

• In January 2014, 15.1% (1.26 million) of pupils in England had SEN without statements. (Department for Education, 2014, Special Educational Needs in England, January 2014)

• In 2012/13, of the 743,380 people who entered higher education, 9.8% were disabled learners. (Higher Education Statistics Agency)

• Disabled adults are twice as likely as non-disabled adults to have no formal qualifications, 26% and 12% respectively. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: ONS Measuring National Well-being – Education and Skills, 2012)

• It is predicted that by 2020, 42% of jobs will require a degree level qualification or above. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013:Increasing life chance through learning and skills, DRC)

• The number of 16-65 year olds who only have the English skills at the level expected of 5 to 7 year olds increased from 3.4% (1.1 million) to 5% (1.7 million). (National Literacy Trust, State of Nation A picture of Literacy in the UK today, January 2012)

Children

• Children in families containing 1 or more disabled person/s are twice as likely to live in households in combined low income and material deprivation as those in families with no disabled person, 22% compared to 10%. (DWP 2014, Households Below Average Income)

• In 2014, a Scope report revealed that 69% of parents with disabled children have difficulty accessing local services for their children, and 90% were worried about cuts to the local services that they need. (Scope, 2014. New research: Parents of disabled children ‘frustrated’ ‘stressed’ and ‘exhausted’)

• It is estimated that around 748,000 children and young people aged 5 to 16 in Great Britain have mental ill health. Around 78,000 of these have autistic spectrum disorders. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013)

• In 2011/12, 6% (or 0.8 million) of children under the age of 16 in the UK were disabled. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Family Resources Survey, United Kingdom, 2011/12, June 2013)

• Only 1 in 13 disabled children receive a regular support service of any sort from their local authority. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013:Contact a Family, Research, 2012)

• About 60% of children and young people with both learning disabilities and mental ill health live in poverty. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: NHS REPORT, Equal Treatment, Closing The Gap)

Living

• In 2014, 54% of disabled people who have looked for accessible homes said they found them difficult to find, ranking them above 8 out of 10 on a ‘difficulty scale’. (Leonard Cheshire Report , The Hidden Housing Crisis, 2014)

• Disabled people’s day to day living costs are 25% higher than those of non-disabled people. (Leonard Cheshire Disability: Facts and Figures 2014)

• A substantially higher proportion of people who live in families with disabled members live in poverty, compared to people who live in families where no one is disabled. (DWP 2014, Households Below Average Income)

• Over 1 in 4 disabled people say that they frequently do not have choice and control over their daily lives. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of National Statistics, Opinions Survey, 2011)

• There is a clear shortage of housing that is specifically designed to meet disabled people’s needs. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: English Housing Survey, 2007)

• The poverty rate for disabled adults in the UK (30%) is twice as high as that for non-disabled adults. This is particularly the case for people living in families containing 1 or more disabled family members and not receiving disability benefits. 12% of those in receipt of disability benefits live in low-income households, compared to 24% of those who do not receive disability benefits. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013)

Visual Impairments

• In March 2014, 143,400 people were registered as blind, a decrease of 4,400 (3%) from March 2011. 147,700 people were registered as partially sighted, a decrease of 3,300 (2%) from March 2011. (NHS Information Centre, 2014, Registered Blind and Partially Sighted People Year ending 31 March 2014, online)

• 61% of blind and 64% of partially sighted people are aged 75 or over. (NHS Information Centre, 2014, Registered Blind and Partially Sighted People Year ending 31 March 2014, online) • There are around 25,000 blind or partially sighted children between the ages of 0–16. Around half have additional disabilities and/or special educational needs. (RNIB, 2013, Sight Loss UK 2013 report)

• There are 1.87 million people in the UK with sight loss that has a significant impact on their daily lives. This upwards trend is expected to continue. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013)

• The UK employment rate for people who are long term disabled with a visual impairment is 47%. For registered blind or partially sighted people it is 33%. (RNIB Sight Loss UK 2012 Report)

Hearing Impairments

• Action on Hearing Loss estimates that more than 10 million (about 1 in 6) people in the UK have some degree of hearing impairment or deafness. (Action on Hearing Loss statistical Report 2014)

• Every year, around 840 babies are born with a significant hearing impairment. About 1 in 1,000 children are deaf at 3 years of age. (English Federation of Disability Sport, 2014, Facts and Statistics, online)

• By 2031, it is estimated that there will be 14.5 million people with hearing loss in the UK. (Action on Hearing Loss statistical Report 2014)

• More than 800,000 people in the UK are severely or profoundly deaf. (Action on Hearing Loss statistical Report 2014)

• There are more than 45,000 deaf children in the UK, plus many more who experience temporary hearing loss. (Action on Hearing Loss statistical Report 2014)

• Approximately 28% of people who are hearing impaired are between 16-60 years of age, and 72% are over 60. (NHS Choices, Hearing Impairment Introduction, Last Updated 01/04/2013

• 43% of deaf children achieved 5 GCSEs (including English and Maths) at grades A* to C compared to 70%% of children with no identified SEN. This means that 57% of deaf children are failing to achieve the government’s expected benchmark for GCSE success compared to just 30% of other children. (NDCS note on Department for Education figures on attainment for deaf children in 2013 (England) Updated: 3 February 2014)

Learning Disabilities

• Adults with learning disabilities are 10 times more likely to be blind or partially sighted than the general population. (RNIB Knowledge & Research 2014)

• Around 20% of people (1 in 5) with epilepsy also have a learning disability. (Epilepsy Society Fact Sheet No 5, November 2014)

• Children with a learning disability are often socially excluded and 8 out of 10 children with a learning disability are bullied. (Mencap Facts about learning disability 2014)

• 75% of GPs have received no training to help them treat people with a learning disability. (Mencap Facts about learning disability 2014)

• There are over 1 million adults aged over 20 and 410,000 children aged up to 19 years old who have a learning disability in the UK. Of this, around 230,000-350,000 people are estimated to have severe learning disabilities. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: The Estimated Prevalence of Visual Impairment among People with Learning Disabilities in UK report, 2011)

Health and Social Care

• 93% of GPs would recommend specific training on learning disability to all health professionals. (Papworth Trust Disability in the UK Facts & Figures 2014)

• Disabled people make up around one third of the NHS users in Britain. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of Disability Issues, Accessible Information)

• The majority of impairments are not visible; there are only around 1.2 million wheelchair users in the UK, roughly 2% of UK population. (English Federation of Disability Sport, 2014, Facts and Statistics)

• In 2012/13, local authorities in England spent £17.1 billion on adult social services for 1.3 million service users. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Personal Social Service Expenditure and Unit Cost 2012/13 Provisional Release. NHS information centre)

Accessibility outside the House

• Less than a third of department stores have accessible changing rooms. (DWP Disability Audit December 2014)

• Two thirds of retail staff have no training in how to help disabled customers. (DWP Disability Audit December 2014)

• 40% of restaurants and a third of department stores do not have an accessible toilet. (DWP Disability Audit December 2014)

• 20% of high street shops have no ramps for wheelchairs. (DWP Disability Audit December 2014)

• Only 15% of retailers have hearing loops for shoppers with hearing impairments. (DWP Disability Audit December 2014)

• 29% of adults (over 16 years old) with impairments have found some buildings outside of the home inaccessible. That’s compared to 6% of adults without impairments. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of Disability Issues, Life opportunities Survey, Wave One, 2009-2011)

• The 6 most common buildings where access is difficult for adults with impairments are:

• Shops – 53%

• Hospitals – 35%

• Bars and Restaurants – 23%

• Other people’s homes – 21%

• GP Surgery – 19%

• Theatre and Cinemas – 17%

(Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of Disability Issues, Life opportunities Survey, 2009-2011)

• The most common barriers to accessing buildings for adults with impairments are:

• Moving around the building – stairs, doors or narrow corridors (44%)

• A health condition, illness or impairment (39%)

• A disability (32%)

• Inadequate lifts or escalators (23%)

• Difficulty with approach areas due to lack of ramps/handrails (22%)

• Parking problems (21%)

• Bathroom facilities (location, layout, size) (17%)

• Footpath design and surfaces (15%)

• Difficulty with transport getting to the building (14%)

• Lack of help or assistance (13%).

(Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of Disability Issues, Life opportunities Survey, 2009-2011)

Transportation • Around one fifth of disabled people report having difficulties related to their impairment or disability in accessing transport. (Office for Disability Issues, ONS Opinions Survey, 2011)

• All full size single deck buses over 7.5 tonnes will be fully accessible from 1 January 2016, and all double deck buses from 1 January 2017. (Department for Transport, Bus, Coach Accessibility FAQ)

• 60% of disabled people have no car available to their household, compared to 27% of the overall population. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Parliament Environment Audit Committee, Written evidence submitted by Transport for All, 12 September 2012)

• 75% of adults with an impairment experience barriers to using transport, compared with 60% of adults without an impairment. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Office of Disability Issues, Life Opportunities Survey, Wave One, 2009-2011)

• The estimated number of valid blue badge holders in March 2012 was 2.62 million. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: DFT Blue Badge Scheme Statistics 2011/12)

• At the end of March 2013, there were 78,000 licensed taxis in England and Wales, with 58% wheelchair accessible (around 45,000 in total). This figure is broadly unchanged since 2009. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Taxi and Private Hire vehicle Statistics, England and Wales 2013)

• In London, all buses are wheelchair accessible, all black cabs are wheelchair accessible, and access to all trams is step free. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: Transport For London)

Justice

• People with learning disabilities and difficulties in the justice system are not getting equal access to the law or support to successfully complete prison or community sentences because information presented to them is not made accessible. (Prison Reform Trust: Fair Access to Justice 2012)

• Two in five (37%) of those over the age of 50 in prison have a disability. (Prison Reform Trust Oct 2014)

• In 2013/14, there were 44,480 hate crimes recorded by the police, an increase of five per cent compared with 2012/13, of which 1,985 (4%) were disability hate crimes. (Home Office Statistical Bulletin 2013/14)

• Disabled people are significantly more likely to be crime victims than non-disabled people. This gap is largest among 16-34 year-olds, where 39% of disabled people reported being victim s of crime, compared to 28% of non-disabled people. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: British Crime Survey 2010/11)

• More than 20% of disabled people have experienced harassment in public because of their impairment. (Papworth Trust – Disability in the United Kingdom, Facts and Figures, December 2013: British Crime Survey 2010/11)

Literacy (General)

• There is a strong link between literacy and employability in the UK: people with the lowest levels of literacy are the least likely to be employed while only 2% of families with good levels of literacy live in workless households. (WHO review Oct 2013)

• Just 59% of boys met the expected standard in writing in 2013 to 2014, compared with three-quarters of girls. (BBC Education & Family October 2014)

• Children and young people who engage in technology based texts, such as blogs, enjoy writing more and have more positive attitudes towards writing – 57% express a general enjoyment of writing vs 40% who don’t have a blog. (Literacy: State of the Nation. A picture of literacy in the UK today, last udated 10 January 2012)

• There is a consistent gender difference in attitudes towards writing. Boys do not enjoy writing as much as girls (38% vs 52%). (Literacy: State of the Nation. A picture of literacy in the UK today, last udated 10 January 2012)

• 1 in 6 people in the UK struggle with Literacy. This means their literacy is below the level expected of an eleven year old. (Literacy: State of the Nation. A picture of literacy in the UK today, last udated 10 January 2012)

Internet users

• 3 million adults aged 75 years and over have never used the internet. (Office of National Statistics, Internet Access Quarterly Update Q4 2013, 19 February 2014)

• There are 22.2 million male internet. (Office of National Statistics, Internet Access Quarterly Update Q4 2013, 19 February 2014)

• There are 22.1 million female internet users. (Office of National Statistics, Internet Access Quarterly Update Q4 2013, 19 February 2014)

• 3.6 million disabled adults have never used the internet, 53% of the 7.1 million adults who had never used the Internet. (Office of National Statistics, Internet Access Quarterly Update Q4 2013, 19 February 2014)

• A third of disabled people have never used the internet, compared to just 8% of non-disabled people – a ‘digital divide’ of 25%. (Leonard Cheshire Disability: Facts & Figures 2014)

Updated February 2015

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